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  • brads's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:59
    Just wondering if anybody has a suggestion for a good text book on product design. I am interested in a text book for self study on the design side of products. At this stage I am most interested in the aesthetics and user interface aspects of product design.
    0 replies | 54 view(s)
  • tmer1's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:17
    Thanks for the detailed information K.I.S.S. I will think about these points more if I get past the next testing phase. Cheers, Tmer
    12 replies | 657 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 18:40
    Thank you for advice... I checked almost everything that competitors did... and i know that this design has few drawbacks, but I think that it has even more advantages... well... i have to finish this lounger till wednesday and then we'll do some crucial tests...
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • Lochnagar's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 18:29
    Hi Maniac, You might not like the price of the hinge you have posted a link to below http://www.downwindmarine.com/images/P/105299.jpg - but I have got one of these hinges on my computer chair (and it has a clamp lever which applies pressure to the stack of plates) - in order to provide a brake. Sounds good in practice - but in reality I am forever adjusting the clamping mechanism - maybe every 2 or 3 weeks:( I would maybe have a review of your design - because as I said in my earlier postings - it is always worth while taking a very critical look at what your competitors are doing - and asking yourself - is your design really better - is this really progress. With your competitor sun-loungers - you don't need to get off them in some case in order to adjust them - which you will have to do with your design. Be very critical of your own ideas - because if you are not - your customers certainly will be. It might be worth getting 20 "experienced" customers to try out your...
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • K.I.S.S.'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 17:42
    No problem - although collision can be avoided through the careful calculation of the length of the strip and a custom made profile of the strip with two 'weak' points that will deform more readily than the rest of the plastic. Alternatively, I'd suggest that you alter the orientation of your wooden lattices from horizontal to vertical and simply have them interlaced at the folding points, with a continuous hinge bar inter-connecting them. That's about all I've got really...:)
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 17:29
    hm... could be a solution, but then you'll have constant collision between upper parts while opening/closing... it must be some system with "rigid" center of rotation... btw nice video... thank you... maybe will be useful in future :)
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • K.I.S.S.'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 17:20
    Hi Maniac, From the images you've posted, it doesn't appear that a 90 degree rotation will be exceeded per individual hinge? Have you considered a continuous plastic strip embedded within the wooden frame? Something like Polyethylene perhaps? There's actually a refinement to this https://www.inventables.com/technologies/shape-retaining-plastic It might work for your application as the change of state within your product will be relatively low for the lifespan of the product. Of course, some calculation would need to be performed to get a balance between flexibility and ridgidity. K.I.S.S.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 16:30
    I was looking at that profile few days ago and it could work, but it takes more space and bigger gap appears between those two wooden parts... Only thing that I found and that could work fine is - concealed hinges http://www.downwindmarine.com/images/P/105299.jpg only drawback is high price... P.S.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • Lochnagar's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 16:22
    Hi Maniac, Ah - so you are not looking for a mechanism - but just a replacement for the piano hinge. Sometimes there is a need to synchronize the moving parts - and one way this can be done is with a geared hinge - see link below. You can perhaps see the idea - and make your own - to suit the structural loads. http://www.acelocksmith.com/continuous_door_hinge.html Hope this helps.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 16:04
    I have already tested prototype and it works great... but only thing that I wanted to change is those piano hinges that I used on prototype... there are three or maybe just two angles (not a big thing to change) to set for backrest, but main problem was unstability when you sit at the very end... this problem is solved with simple mechanism, but I'm not allowed to show it how... solution with the mechanism on the outside isn't solution, looks cheap :)... thank you anyway for idea...
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • Lochnagar's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 15:54
    Hi Maniac, One important feature of any sun-lounger is its structural stability. I would like to see how you envisage changing the angle of the back rest - whilst maintaining good structural stability? What is the additional feature that you haven't shown? One type of hinge is a round bar of wood - with a metal bar running through it - see the picture below. http://www.swimming-pool-online.com/teak-garden-furniture/teak-sun-loungers-bahia.html Hope this helps.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • gsanandian's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 15:38
    SATHISH ANAND.G Email : gsanandian@gmail.com DOB : 01/01/1988 Master of Engineering degree Engineering Design SUMMARY. An eminent professional with 3 Years of experience as Mechanical Design Engineer. Sufficient Knowledge in Drafting, GD & T and Manufacturing. Possessing thorough awareness in Reverse Engineering and 3d modelling.
    3 replies | 551 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 15:38
    Well I hope I'll have just memories one day about croatia :)... I can adjust angle for back rest and also one additional feature that isn't shown here :D...
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • Lochnagar's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 15:13
    Hi Maniac, Thanks for the additional pictures - I can see what you are trying to do now. However, I would like to ask the obvious question - which is - how is your design going to be better than the one depicted below in the hyperlink - because the sun-lounger shown below is simplicity itself? Additionally, with the sun-lounger depicted below - you can adjust the height (angle) of the back rest very easily - which is an important "design feature" - which I can't see is possible in your design. I appreciate that everyone wants to come up with something new - but it is always worth asking yourself - is it really better than what than what has already been designed by your competitors. http://www.houzz.com/photos/22018987/Jane-Hamley-Wells-TAJI-Lounger-modern-patio-furniture-and-outdoor-furniture Hope this helps.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 10:42
    Well... no actuators (pulled/moved by hand)... I'm making some kind of extendable chair... please check enclosed images (solidworks)... those parts are some kind of frames, and I should fit mechanisam between (inside) those two parts... For testing purposes I put piano hinges and it works great, but that affects look and I'm trying to avoid it if possible... red marked two centers of rotation
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • Lochnagar's Avatar
    29th Mar '15, 09:48
    Hi Maniac, It is not very clear from your post - what you are expecting/wanting to achieve. However, to try and move the debate on - see a picture of a mechanism with the hyperlink below that is regularly used to achieve at least 180 degree rotation on digger buckets. (Zoom in on image 2 in the hyperlink below). You say the parts are wooden - so I am going to take a guess you would not want a hydraulic actuator to move this mechanism - but you could use an electric motor to drive a small leadscrew (to replace the hydraulic actuator in the picture below) - and use proximity switches to trip the motor out - when you reach the extremities of the two positions, i.e. 0 degrees and 180 degrees. http://www.google.com/patents/US5592762 Hope this helps.
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • K.I.S.S.'s Avatar
    28th Mar '15, 16:57
    Hi tmer1, We use Neodymium magnets in our products - we also make use of a custom designed cup to direct the flux. Our application is different to yours, as we require the magnet to actuate a plastic bodied solenoid (with windings around the bobbin of the solenoid body). We custom made our first cups by having them wire cut - think of a four pronged star that gets formed into a cup with four small slits around the periphery. We now get them stamped and formed on a manufacturing basis, but a couple of practical points for you to keep in mind, based on our learning curve - you will need to stabilize the magnet in the centre of the cup, irrespective of your application. Our preferred adhesive for this is Locktite 480 (expensive, but does the job). A micro applicator is used to apply a tiny, specific amount to each cup. Also, commercially produced stamped parts will have a light sheen of oil on them - dipping in Acetone prior to applying the glue is required to make the...
    12 replies | 657 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    28th Mar '15, 09:06
    ebay... many various housings and cells...
    2 replies | 419 view(s)
  • tmer1's Avatar
    28th Mar '15, 07:09
    from what I understand this mounting magnet idea is really good because it will reduce the magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetisation direction. However I see that the mounting magnet sizes I need are smaller then whats on offer. The diameter of the mounting magnet must be no more then 10mm. Also it could be that the mounting magnet leads to forces that are too big actually. I may look into it further if the current magnets and board I am ordering does not do a good job. Thanks for the info.
    12 replies | 657 view(s)
  • Asin's Avatar
    27th Mar '15, 22:42
    Sorry about my belated response. My field is production procedure of steel structures Projects such us: Residential Buildings, Office Blocks, Store Houses, Industrial Constructions.Telecommunications Towers, Electric-Power Towers, Hot-Dip Galvanized Products, Metal Parts for Defensive Systems, Conveyors, Electrostatics Filters, Silos & TankersFuel Tankers ADR, Rail Wagons, Civilian & Military Trailers, Truck Bodies. Modeler -detailer user on Tekla Structure and Inventor.
    2 replies | 91 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    27th Mar '15, 21:55
    I have one let say simple question... which mechanism to use instead of hinges? Please check enclosed image... P.S. No collision allowed... sensitive wooden parts... Thank you :)...
    13 replies | 296 view(s)
  • _Maniac_'s Avatar
    27th Mar '15, 21:44
    I'm new here and just came by to say hello... :) BR
    0 replies | 65 view(s)
  • Bill @ ERG's Avatar
    27th Mar '15, 19:20
    Cup style magnet assemblies have a magnet with a steel cup around the magnet, leaving one edge nominally flush with the face of the magnet. Locally we can get a cup magnet with a 6mm diameter rare-earth magnet that can be pressed or glued into a 3/8" hole. The cup increases the holding force by up to 4X, while reducing the flux on all but the open side of the assembly. For the 6mm magnet, this would represent a maximum force of about 10 lbs with cup and suitable surface. A local supplier has a link to their website http://www.leevalley.com/en/Hardware/page.aspx?p=58750&cat=3,42363,42348&ap=1 This is a link explaining how they work, and showing the difference in flux density. https://www.kjmagnetics.com/blog.asp?p=mounting-magnets I am assuming that similar assemblies are available in your location. You could try specialty hardware stores, scientific / educational supply stores, hobby shops etc. The
    12 replies | 657 view(s)
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