Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 24 Hours Last 24 Hours Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums Articles Articles Blog Blogs Groups Groups
  • srdfmc's Avatar
    Today, 05:57
    MATLAB or MATHCAD are mandatory IMOHO.
    2 replies | 395 view(s)
  • srdfmc's Avatar
    Today, 05:50
    I do agree with Peter. SW is the best CAD/CAE soft if you have the right budget for it and use its mechanical engineering features. Otherwise, be advise that a lot of its content will be of no use for you. More over, Dassault-System appears to have completely neglected their SME/independent basis by doing nothing on the issue of Pirate copies and non-licensed usage. As a low level mechanical user (I mean in term of technicality) you will come heads on competing with individuals using pirated copies of SW/CATIA as Web freelancer. Hard to make a margin that way, I tell you. So I strongly advise you to narrow your buy in function of what will make the diff on your market. Rendering, BoM, architectural compatibility, 3D model integration, is what comes to my mind after a few seconds. But you'll certainly get more in the details. Oh and by the way, I do work with SW. It's a terrific package for what I do but the limits are there as exposed. I didn't buy Comsol at the time...
    6 replies | 905 view(s)
  • srdfmc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 22:18
    Hi Adam, Just sent you an email. Have a look at your mailbox ;) Here are some samples of my work quickly accessible on the forum: http://www.mechanicaldesignforum.com/showthread.php?1026-Rendering-enhanced-reality
    2 replies | 240 view(s)
  • PeterB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 20:43
    Despite the fact that I've been a Solidworks user, pretty well since it was launched and would highly recommend it for ease of learning and use, that doesn't mean it, or any other particularly popular brand is right for your needs. Firstly you need to buy into something that fits with your particular requirements and your industry. If you work with suppliers or supply to others, then you may have to be closely connected to whatever they want to use and it could be an 'industry standard' CAD system. If much of what you need to do is sheet metal, Swks, Solid Edge and some others can all give you some highly useful tools. But more specialist tools for carrying out particular types of forming may be available from other CAD systems. If you depend on Class A surfacing and organic forms, then those too might be best sourced from an alternative system. So first list out all the things you require from your CAD system and get them checked over and demonstrated to your...
    6 replies | 905 view(s)
  • PeterB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 20:31
    Image isn't visible. Thin-wall moulding is done with parts such as mobile phone casings and generally requires hi-flow polymer grades to work well. PC or PC-ABS alloys are often used in those applications, as the stiffer materials allow thinner walls to survive under duress. But you should be using whatever wall thickness is necessary after carrying out suitable stress/strain assessment for your product and the part design. If weight support is required, additional wall thickness or ribbing may be necessary to support it. Also, don't forget that any rib or boss walls adjoining the external case wall, must be 2/3 of the external wall thickness or less, in order to stand a chance of avoiding sink marks and distortion. As well, if you are using snap hook details, then they may need to interlock with a recess. If that is into a 1.0mm wall, there isn't much depth there to engage with. So, again, proper stress/strain assessment on loads must be considered first. If you don't...
    2 replies | 1249 view(s)
  • PeterB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 20:22
    You can probably have whatever texture the part needs to function correctly. The texture is applied to the mould tool prior to use and that can be done in different ways. Sand or bead blasting can be used. In fact bead blast is the main chosen route with aluminium tooling. Spark erosion is very common, particularly in economy tooling programmes, as it is often part of the tool manufacture process anyway. A full DIN standard erosion chart/stick can be obtained from good engineering supply companies, the machine manufacturers, or sourced on the web at quite low cost. Chemical etching is also used commonly, particularly where special patterning is required, or an easy-clean texture needed. So this is often employed on higher-volume projects as with vehicle manufacturers. Again, the process suppliers (Moldtec and others) will have moulded sample books with hundreds of different patterns for selection.
    10 replies | 5814 view(s)
  • PeterB's Avatar
    Yesterday, 20:09
    TPEs are thermoplastic elastomers. So they are generally mouldable by heating to whatever the particular material requires. They are not a single compound, but come from different suppliers in many differing materials and grades. If this band has actually been injection moulded in TPE, then the degree of heat which the PCB needed to accommodate/resist, will depend on the initial melt temperature of the material used, its thickness or volume and the cycle time of the process. The component population may have been selected on the basis of heat resistance too. If there are low-temperature TPEs around, then they might not be much use if they re-melt on your product when in hot climates! After all, they remain thermoplastic all their lives. To discover if that sample band is TPE, put a heated metal blade onto it. If it melts it is probably TPE. If it doesn't then it must be a type of thermoset material. It may be more likely that this material is a silicone rubber. They are...
    6 replies | 921 view(s)
  • Dovile's Avatar
    Yesterday, 19:14
    Rolls-Royce has an excellent opportunity for Pipe Stress Engineers to join our Nuclear Submarine Business in Derby. The Current Class Pipe Stress Team, part of the Primary Components Operational Business Unit within Submarines, are looking to recruit Pipe Stress engineers to support the design, manufacture and safety justification of Nuclear Steam Raising Plant pipework and components. Rolls-Royce is home to some of the world's finest minds. And nowhere are those minds more keenly tested than in our growing nuclear business. Our team is comprised of a broad range of experts in the fields of engineering, manufacturing, project management and procurement. This is your chance to join them. Our submarines business is growing on a global scale. We support the Royal Navy as the technical authority to the UK Ministry of Defence for naval reactor plants and we're continuing to build our nuclear sector capability. For you, this means unique opportunities to work across our portfolio...
    0 replies | 41 view(s)
  • Camid's Avatar
    Yesterday, 16:31
    Hi Harshith Solidworks - if only for the fact that you will need to share data with others who will probably use SW. We have used it since 1998 - not without its issues and bugs! But gets the job done. One alternative if cost is an issue - Autodesk Fusion 360. Very promising CAD system but no 2d option currently. Good luck!
    6 replies | 905 view(s)
  • JamieLill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 14:48
    Dont take any more responses Just by Solidworks best cad system out there.
    6 replies | 905 view(s)
  • JamieLill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 14:47
    Go back to the designer and have him change his design. Explain to him for manufacturability and cost the design should change. Bring couple of designs you can work with
    7 replies | 849 view(s)
  • MichaelCreighton's Avatar
    Yesterday, 14:17
    We have done a fair bit of prototype overmolding. You can see a video of the process we use here: http://youtu.be/bwhdQPksBX0 We typically use polyurethane mold rubbers from Polytek: http://www.polytek.com/products/liquid-mold-rubbers/polyurethane-mold-rubbers/ This would not be a great solution for mass production, but if you only need to make a few samples it will work just fine.
    6 replies | 921 view(s)
  • Dovile's Avatar
    18th Sep '14, 19:15
    Rolls-Royce has an excellent opportunity for Pipe Stress Engineers to join our Nuclear Submarine Business in Derby. The Current Class Pipe Stress Team, part of the Primary Components Operational Business Unit within Submarines, are looking to recruit Pipe Stress engineers to support the design, manufacture and safety justification of Nuclear Steam Raising Plant pipework and components. Rolls-Royce is home to some of the world's finest minds. And nowhere are those minds more keenly tested than in our growing nuclear business. Our team is comprised of a broad range of experts in the fields of engineering, manufacturing, project management and procurement. This is your chance to join them. Our submarines business is growing on a global scale. We support the Royal Navy as the technical authority to the UK Ministry of Defence for naval reactor plants and we're continuing to build our nuclear sector capability. For you, this means unique opportunities to work across our portfolio...
    0 replies | 104 view(s)
  • tomcatonnet99's Avatar
    36 replies | 3477 view(s)
  • K.I.S.S.'s Avatar
    17th Sep '14, 18:30
    Hi, I think that you are missing the point - the 'toy model' sketch that I posted for you made use of two essentially identical cams that made use of identical profiles and identical circumferences on the belt contact area. At the time, I said that these were grossly exaggerated for the purposes of visual clarity, and that in reality the driven cam for an application such as yours would be far less obround. There's also no reason why you can't modify this concept to include two cams of different contact areas with the belt - You can easily pop in a different spindle on each cam to alter the drive ratio to 10:1 or whatever suits your needs. Also, keep in mind that there will be no 'spring back' - the block (follower) will simply be pushed back through spring pressure against the profile of the cam. If this trailing cam profile is identical to the leading profile of the cam, then you will achieve an identical winding in each direction. It's all about the cam profile you design, and...
    36 replies | 3477 view(s)
  • tomcatonnet99's Avatar
    17th Sep '14, 05:55
    thanks for the excellent pdf on cam design. I think we clearly aren't on the same page as regds the coil winder: 1) your design with the belt driven cams would not work for following reasons: a) the belt would turn the driven cam 360deg for every rotation which means the spool guide would travel the length of the coil for every turn ( hence producing a kind of diagonal wind and not a wind Perpendicular to the uptake bobbin) and spring back to start point I need for the the spool guide to only progress (laterally) the pitch required Per turn ( and not return to start position) but progress to the next turn and so on upto the length of the coil, before reversing its travel direction ( again as per the pitch Per turn)
    36 replies | 3477 view(s)
  • ooooo!'s Avatar
    17th Sep '14, 05:24
    Hello all My customer wants to change the material of large electrical riveted enclosures we make from GI (1.0226) sheets to Corten-A grade sheets (2-3mm). Personally I have not seen an enclosure or cabinet made out of Corten-A steel which is primarily used to make locomotive shell body or steel structures that require better corrosion resistance. Do you guys have some points on benefit of using GI over Corten-A. (The enclosures that we make are used in dynamic application in rolling stock). I am not able to find much technical stuff which would prove that GI (1.0226) is equivalent to Corten-A. Regards ..
    0 replies | 80 view(s)
  • sbs.ajay's Avatar
    16th Sep '14, 20:01
    :)We are working for the following three openings with a well established MNC company having a large Mechanical R&D center in Mumbai 1) Mechanical Design Engineer - Experience - 3 - 4 years - Preferably in rotary machine manufacturing and design. Job Description + Role & Responsibility: Understand Engineering Design Functions, NPI/NPD/Engineering Change Orders, BOM, Product Life Cycle Management. Solid Works or Solid Edge design and guidance preferable. 2) Senior Mechanical Design Documentation Engineer - Experience - 5-7 years. Should have extensive knowledge and worked hands on on Mechanical design and drawing. Should have edited / created Technical Manuals / User Manual, Service Manuals Test scripts and other documentation. Knowledge of ISO Documentation, PLM, QC documentation is a plus but not necessary. Candidate would be handling company wide drawings and design and coming up with process documentation standards within the organization and should amply...
    0 replies | 104 view(s)
  • sbs.ajay's Avatar
    16th Sep '14, 19:57
    We are working for the following three openings with a well established MNC company having a large Mechanical R&D center in Mumbai 1) Mechanical Design Engineer - Experience - 3 - 4 years - Preferably in rotary machine manufacturing and design. Job Description + Role & Responsibility: Understand Engineering Design Functions, NPI/NPD/Engineering Change Orders, BOM, Product Life Cycle Management. Solid Works or Solid Edge design and guidance preferable. 2) Senior Mechanical Design Documentation Engineer - Experience - 5-7 years. Should have extensive knowledge and worked hands on on Mechanical design and drawing. Should have edited / created Technical Manuals / User Manual, Service Manuals Test scripts and other documentation. Knowledge of ISO Documentation, PLM, QC documentation is a plus but not necessary. Candidate would be handling company wide drawings and design and coming up with process documentation standards within the organization and should amply...
    0 replies | 89 view(s)
More Activity